https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Three-McKelvey-Engineering-faculty-working-on-prestigious-MURI-collaborations.aspx1033Three McKelvey Engineering faculty working on prestigious MURI collaborations <img alt="Lew, Thimsen, Vorobeychik" src="/news/PublishingImages/three_fac2.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>Three faculty in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis are participating in the U.S. Department of Defense's highly competitive Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative Program (MURI) on projects that may benefit the U.S. military.</p><p>Matthew Lew, assistant professor of electrical & systems engineering; Elijah Thimsen, assistant professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering; and Yevgeniy Vorobeychik, associate professor of computer science & engineering, are each on teams that received one of 24 MURI awards totaling $169 million. The research teams include more than one traditional science and engineering discipline to speed the research process.</p><p><g class="gr_ gr_25 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling ins-del" id="25" data-gr-id="25">Lew is</g> working with a team developing a new class of functional living electronics, which they call <g class="gr_ gr_26 gr-alert gr_spell gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim ContextualSpelling ins-del multiReplace" id="26" data-gr-id="26">livtronics</g>, in which they will determine whether there is a way to engineer and assemble electronic systems based on living materials, such as proteins and bacteria instead of traditional materials, such as silicon. Lew's role is to use fluorescence imaging technology to visualize how electrons are transported through living systems either within the bacterial cell or between bacterial cells in the biofilm. <a href="https://dornsife.usc.edu/news/stories/2809/dod-grants-biology-physics-chemistry-multidisciplinary/">The total project received $7.5 million over five years</a>.</p><p>Thimsen is working with a research team investigating how to use dusty plasma, or plasma in which particles are suspended, to make new materials. They will study how to build on what is known about making powders to determine how to make solids, such as ultra-hard and tough ceramics, such as cubic boron nitride. To create the material, researchers are using a low-temperature plasma, which is a <g class="gr_ gr_31 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar multiReplace" id="31" data-gr-id="31">highly</g> nonequilibrium environment that can provide access to unique and potentially useful states of matter. The five-year project received $6.4 million.</p><p>Vorobeychik is working with a team developing tools to understand and shape online and on-the-ground networks that drive human decision making. It will focus on areas such as international diplomacy, street crime, terrorism, military strategy, financial markets <g class="gr_ gr_35 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="35" data-gr-id="35">and</g> industrial supply chains. The team is using game theory, which is a mathematical way of modeling how different players interact when their interests are potentially in conflict. These players can be organizations, people or computers. The project will apply multi-scale network modeling to the data created by electronic recordkeeping — social media posts, crime statistics, demographic trends <g class="gr_ gr_36 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="36" data-gr-id="36">and</g> other sources. <a href="https://news.engin.umich.edu/2018/04/6-25m-project-will-decode-worlds-most-complex-networks/">The five-year project received $6.25 million</a>.<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p>Beth Miller 2019-03-15T05:00:00ZMatthew Lew, Elijah Thimsen and Yevgeniy Vorobeychik are each on research teams that received one of 24 MURI projects for the Department of Defense.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/New-era-in-engineering-to-begin-at-Washington-University.aspx1012New era in engineering to begin at Washington University<p>​</p><div class="ms-rtestate-read ms-rte-wpbox" contenteditable="false"><div class="ms-rtestate-notify ms-rtestate-read abdb52fc-e2f3-4ad0-9502-27fc91fb9fc7" id="div_abdb52fc-e2f3-4ad0-9502-27fc91fb9fc7" unselectable="on"></div><div id="vid_abdb52fc-e2f3-4ad0-9502-27fc91fb9fc7" unselectable="on" style="display: none;"></div></div><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/131101_sjh_jim_mckelvey_53.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Furthering its strong trajectory as a leader in research and innovation, the Engineering school at Washington University in St. Louis is taking a major leap forward and reaffirming its commitment to tackling the world’s great engineering challenges with renewed vigor, an ambitious strategic vision <g class="gr_ gr_58 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="58" data-gr-id="58">and</g> a new name.<br/></p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science will be renamed the James McKelvey School of Engineering in honor of trustee and distinguished alumnus Jim McKelvey Jr., who has made an unprecedented and transformative investment in the school.<br/> <br/>“The McKelvey name has become synonymous with innovation and entrepreneurship in the St. Louis region and well beyond,” said Chancellor Mark Wrighton. “There is no better way to make a statement about what our Engineering school stands for than by giving it a name that represents being ahead of the curve and blazing a trail of creative problem solving through technology.<div><br/>“This is a historic milestone for the university and comes at a perfect time — when we are sharpening our efforts to advance innovation and entrepreneurship, coupling science with technology in all fields from computer science to biomedical engineering and attacking global challenges such as energy and the environment. We are tremendously grateful to Jim for this investment, which expands the significant contributions the McKelvey family has made to this institution.”<div><br/>The commitment will be used to fund endowed scholarships and professorships, as well as the dean’s highest priorities for advancing the school and its impact on lives and communities in St. Louis and around the world. In particular, the commitment will allow the school to create educational and research programs that integrate computing with the humanities, social sciences, arts <g class="gr_ gr_72 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="72" data-gr-id="72">and</g> other disciplines, and it will support the school’s effort to enhance the region’s innovation and entrepreneurial ecosystem. In addition to major support for facilities, McKelvey Jr.’s past giving includes scholarships and general support for the Engineering school.<br/></div><div><br/></div><div> <blockquote>“Under the strong leadership of Dean Aaron Bobick, the Engineering school is positioned for true greatness, and this is the right time to step forward with this investment,” McKelvey Jr. said. “Engineering fields are moving at an exponential growth rate, and to keep up with that requires tremendous investment of resources: human, physical and financial.”</blockquote>“This is a great day for the School of Engineering and for the university,” said Chancellor-elect Andrew D. Martin. “We are embarking on a new era that builds on the momentum and energy under Dean Bobick’s leadership. We will unleash the tremendous potential of our smart and talented students and faculty and see where their talents will take us in the new world of technology and innovation. Thanks to the unwavering generosity and support of the entire McKelvey family, the possibilities are limitless. We are profoundly grateful.”<br/>  <br/>McKelvey Jr.’s family — including his wife, Anna; his father, James McKelvey Sr., an alumnus and iconic former dean of the Engineering school; his late mother, Edith McKelvey; and his stepmother, alumna Judith McKelvey, MD — has a long legacy of dedication to Washington University. “We are a Washington University family through and through,” McKelvey Jr. said. “This university has meant so much to us, and it is my privilege to continue our role in providing for the Engineering school’s future.”<br/> <br/>“We are extraordinarily grateful to Jim Jr. and his family for their incredible history of generosity to the Engineering school. Particularly now, while we stand poised to truly transform our approach to research, innovation <g class="gr_ gr_60 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="60" data-gr-id="60">and</g> learning, this new commitment will allow us to advance the McKelvey School of Engineering into the next tier of top engineering programs in this country and the world,” said Bobick, who also is the James M. McKelvey Professor.</div><div><br/>  <blockquote>“This tremendous gift creates new opportunities for our students and faculty to tackle the world’s greatest engineering challenges, and to dramatically expand computing throughout the university. At the same time, it helps ensure that a diverse population of students will have access to a world-class engineering education and enable the school to be a catalyst for economic development for the St. Louis region and beyond,” said Bobick. <br/></blockquote> <br/>Founded in 1857, Washington University’s Engineering school promotes independent inquiry and education with an emphasis on scientific excellence, innovation <g class="gr_ gr_66 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="66" data-gr-id="66">and</g> collaboration without boundaries. With top-ranked research programs in biomedical engineering, environmental engineering <g class="gr_ gr_67 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="67" data-gr-id="67">and</g> computer science, the school attracts many of the best students from around the world to its 40 different degree programs. The school recently launched several new graduate programs, including an interdisciplinary doctoral program in imaging science, one of only two such programs in the United States; an innovative doctoral program that combines data sciences with social work, political science and psychological and brain sciences; and a new master’s program in cybersecurity engineering. New bachelor’s programs include environmental engineering, a joint business <g class="gr_ gr_68 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="68" data-gr-id="68">and</g> computer science degree, and a joint math and computer science degree. Key components of the university’s current east end campus transformation include two major facilities for engineering: James M. McKelvey, Sr. Hall (to open in 2020) for the Department of Computer Science & Engineering and other computational programs, and Henry A. and Elvira H. Jubel Hall (to open in 2019) for the Department of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science. Since 2000, the school has invested more than $250 million in new and renovated space, which includes 700,000 square feet in the new engineering complex.<br/> <br/>McKelvey Hall was made possible by a $15 million commitment from McKelvey Jr. in 2016 to honor his father who, during his 27 years as dean, transformed the Engineering school from a regional program into a nationally prominent research institution. McKelvey greatly strengthened the quality of the undergraduate and graduate curricula, particularly in emerging fields including computer science; significantly increased both undergraduate and graduate student enrollment; expanded the faculty; dramatically increased federal and other research funding; and grew the endowment for the school more than tenfold from $4 million to nearly $52 million. He also oversaw a remarkable expansion of the school’s footprint on the Danforth Campus.</div><div><br/> <div><span style="color: #666666; font-family: "libre baskerville", "times new roman", serif; font-size: 1.25em;">About Jim McKelvey Jr.</span><br/>Jim McKelvey Jr. is a successful serial entrepreneur and co-founder of Square, <g class="gr_ gr_56 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-del replaceWithoutSep" id="56" data-gr-id="56">a revolutionary</g> financial services and mobile payment company credited with empowering businesses of all sizes around the globe.<br/> <br/>McKelvey Jr. is an independent director of the St. Louis Federal Reserve but is better known for his involvement in several St. Louis­-based startups, including Six Thirty (co-founder), LaunchCode (founder), Third Degree Glass Factory (co-founder), Mira Publishing (founded when he was a Washington University student) and Square, the company he founded in 2009 with Jack Dorsey. He also is the author of “The Art of Fire: Beginning Glassblowing,” the leading textbook for novice glassblowers.<br/> <br/>As a child, McKelvey Jr. spent formative time at the Engineering school with his father during his tenure as dean. He applied early decision to Washington University and enrolled in 1983, graduating in 1987 with degrees in economics and computer science. While a student, McKelvey Jr. wrote two computer programming textbooks.<br/> <br/>In 2012, the Engineering school presented McKelvey Jr. with its Alumni Achievement Award to recognize his groundbreaking entrepreneurship. In 2017, the university recognized him with the Robert S. Brookings Award, which honors individuals for their extraordinary dedication and generosity to Washington University. In addition to currently serving as a university trustee, he also has served as a member of the Alumni Board of Governors. <br/></div></div></div>​<span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>McKelvey Family<br/></h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><img class="ms-rtePosition-3" src="/news/PublishingImages/131101_sjh_jim_mckelvey_53.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong>​Jim McKelvey Jr.</strong><br rtenodeid="69"/></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;"></span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><ul style="color: #343434; padding-left: 20px; caret-color: #343434;"><li>Serial entrepreneur<br/></li><li>Co-founder of Square<br/></li><li>Wrote two computer programming books while in school<br/></li><li>WashU BS '87 — economics and computer science<br/></li></ul></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><img src="/news/PublishingImages/James%20McKelvey.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>​ </strong></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="text-align: center; color: #343434;"><a href="/news/Pages/Using-bacteria-to-create-a-water-filter-that-kills-bacteria.aspx"> </a><strong>James McKelvey Sr.</strong></span><br/></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;"></span></div><div style="text-align: left;"><ul style="color: #343434; padding-left: 20px; caret-color: #343434;"><li>WashU MS '47, PhD '50 — chemical engineering<br/></li><li>WashU Engineering Dean for 27 years<br/></li></ul></div></div></span>​​  ​ <br/><br/>Jim McKelvey Jr. has made an unprecedented and transformative investment in engineering education at Washington University. (Photo: Sid Hastings/Washington University)Julie Hail Floryhttps://source.wustl.edu/?p=318978&preview=1&_ppp=c465b4de032019-01-31T06:00:00Z​Renamed McKelvey School of Engineering will take innovation, technology and academics to new heights <p>​Renamed McKelvey School of Engineering will take innovation, technology and academics to new heights  <br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Obituary-I--Norman-Katz,-senior-professor-of-electrical--systems-engineering,-86.aspx1008Obituary: I. Norman Katz, senior professor of electrical & systems engineering, 86<img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Norman%20Katz.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>I. Norman Katz, longtime professor of electrical & systems engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, died Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019 in New Jersey. He was 86.</p><p>Katz joined Washington University in St. Louis in 1967 as an associate professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science. He was chair of the Department of Systems Science and Mathematics from 1987-2002 and was co-director of the B.S. program in Systems Science and Mathematics. Over the decades, he taught thousands of Engineering students to develop their reasoning and creative abilities and to think independently through dozens of courses, many of which he developed himself. He also published numerous papers in peer-reviewed journals.</p><p>In 1983, he received a Distinguished Faculty Award from the university in recognition of his dedication to providing personal contact to students and creating a welcoming atmosphere while stimulating students to think. He also served as chair of the Affirmative Action Committee and of the Faculty Advisory Board and was Engineering School representative on the Senate Council.</p><p>Katz retired in 2015 after 48 years at Washington University and became <g class="gr_ gr_38 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="38" data-gr-id="38">senior</g> professor. He was honored in 2015 with several <g class="gr_ gr_39 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar multiReplace" id="39" data-gr-id="39">other <g class="gr_ gr_40 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar multiReplace" id="40" data-gr-id="40">faculty</g></g> who had served many decades in the Preston M. Green Department of Electrical & Systems Engineering.</p><p>Prior to joining Washington University, Katz was at the AVCO Research and Advanced Development in Wilmington, Mass., starting in 1959 as a senior scientist, a section chief, and as manager of the mathematics department. He also served as a consultant to McDonnell Aircraft Co. from 1980-1990.</p><p>"For years, Dr. Katz would ride his bike to campus from west University City — it was a wondrous sight to see him biking back and forth, even as an older gentleman," said Rabbi Hershey Novack, co-director of the Chabad on Campus at Washington University. "He also chanted Torah with the precision of a scientist and the intonation of an artist. He must have done it for more than 70 years, and he was very talented."</p><p>Novack said Katz would often eat lunch with students in the sukkah during the holiday of Sukkot and remind them that he was a scholar of both the sciences and of Jewish law and literature. </p><p>Katz's research focused on the numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, reliable algorithms, parallel computation <g class="gr_ gr_42 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="42" data-gr-id="42">and</g> finite element analysis. He helped to develop the p-version of the finite element method, which is now widely accepted as a reliable computational tool in the finite element analysis of elastic structures, heat transfer <g class="gr_ gr_43 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="43" data-gr-id="43">and</g> related fields, and is implemented in many commercial computer codes.</p><p>"The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University has a distinguished reputation in system science and analysis," said Aaron Bobick, James M. McKelvey Professor and Dean. "Professor Katz was critically important in developing that reputation and contributing to the rise of the School as both a research and education organization."</p><p>A New York native, Katz earned bachelor's and master's degrees in mathematics from Yeshiva University in 1952 and 1954, respectively, and a doctorate in mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959. He is survived by his wife, Judith; son Avi Katz; a brother and sister; three grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.<br/></p><p>A memorial service was held for Katz Jan. 16 in Hackensack, NJ. He was buried Jan. 17 in Jerusalem, Israel. <br/></p>KatzBeth Miller 2019-01-17T06:00:00ZI. Norman Katz, longtime professor of electrical & systems engineering, died Jan. 15 at the age of 86.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Top-WashU-Engineering-stories-of-2018.aspx984Top WashU Engineering stories of 2018<p>​WashU engineers continued their strong research tradition in 2018. Here are 10 stories that had the most impact and reach in 2018:<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/top%2010%20stories%202018.jpg?RenditionID=12" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div class="newsauthor"><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Deans-Podcast-Engineering-the-Future.aspx" style="font-family: "libre baskerville", "times new roman", serif; font-size: 1.25em; background-color: #ffffff; color: #9e0918; outline: 0px;">1. Engineering the Future: The Future of Energy</a><br/></div><div><div data-queryruleid="00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000"><div data-displaytemplate="WebPageItem"><div>The first episode of Dean Aaron Bobick’s new podcast features Professors Vijay Ramani and Rich Axelbaum.</div><div><br/></div><div class="newsauthor"><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <a href="/news/Pages/New-faculty-join-School-of-Engineering--Applied-Science-.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff; font-family: "libre baskerville", "times new roman", serif; font-size: 1.25em;">2. New faculty join School of Engineering & Applied Science</a><br/></div><div><div data-queryruleid="00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000"><div data-displaytemplate="WebPageItem"><div><div class="newsauthor">A diverse group of new faculty joins the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, bringing the total number to 96.5 during the 2018-2019 academic year.<br/></div></div><div> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Cancer-immunotherapy-target-of-WashU-mechanobiology-research.aspx" style="outline: 0px;">3. Cancer immunotherapy target of WashU mechanobiology research</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">One of the latest treatments for cancer is immunotherapy, which involves genetically modifying a patient’s own immune cells to fight tumor growth and spread. An engineer and an immunology researcher at Washington University in St. Louis are collaborating to find a better way to prepare and treat these immune cells to maximize their effectiveness in patients.<br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Sinopoli-named-chair-of-WashU-electrical-systems-engineering.aspx">4. Sinopoli named chair of WashU electrical & systems engineering</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Sinopoli represents 'a new generation of electrical engineers'<br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> <h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"></h3><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/In-the-media-WashU-startup-SentiAR-Inc--awarded-$2-2M-NIH-grant.aspx">5. In the media: WashU startup SentiAR Inc. awarded $2.2M NIH grant</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">SentiAR Inc., a startup that spun out of Washington University in St. Louis’ School of Medicine and School of Engineering last year, has been getting a lot of media attention.<br/><br/></div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/New-imaging-technique-to-use-bioinspired-camera-to-study-tendon,-ligament-damage-.aspx">6. New imaging technique <g class="gr_ gr_46 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar multiReplace" id="46" data-gr-id="46">use</g> <g class="gr_ gr_44 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="44" data-gr-id="44">bioinspired</g> camera to study tendon, ligament damage</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor"><g class="gr_ gr_45 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="45" data-gr-id="45">Camera</g> uses polarized light to measure changes in ligament often injured by baseball pitchers<br/></div></div> <br/> </div></div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/A-first-look-at-McKelvey-Hall.aspx" style="outline: 0px;">7. A first look at McKelvey Hall</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">It’s the final piece of the East End Transformation at Washington University in St. Louis, and new renderings of James M. McKelvey, Sr. Hall demonstrate how the building will incorporate seamlessly into the project.<br/></div> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Bigger-proteins,-stronger-threads-Biosynthetic-spider-silk-Fuzhong-Zhang-Biomacromolecules.aspx">8. Bigger proteins, stronger threads: Synthetic spider silk</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Engineering scientists use bacteria to create biosynthetic silk threads stronger and tougher than before<br/></div> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Making-sense-pictures-of-medical-data-Alvitta-Ottley.aspx">9. Making sense of pictures, medical data</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Improved visual communication with patients could lead to more informed health-care choices.<br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Hopeful-technology-could-change-detection-diagnosis-of-deadly-ovarian-cancer.aspx">10. 'Hopeful technology' could change detection, diagnosis of deadly ovarian cancer</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Ovarian cancer claims the lives of more than 14,000 women in the U.S. each year, ranking fifth among cancer deaths in women. A multidisciplinary team at Washington University in St. Louis <g class="gr_ gr_41 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar multiReplace" id="41" data-gr-id="41">has</g> found an innovative way to use sound and light, or photoacoustic, imaging to diagnose ovarian tumors, which may lead to a promising new diagnostic imaging technique to improve <g class="gr_ gr_40 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="40" data-gr-id="40">current</g> standard of care for patients with ovarian cancer. <br/></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div><div class="cstm-section"><h3>#washuengineers top social media posts of the year<br/></h3><div><strong></strong></div><div><p><strong>facebook:</strong><strong> </strong><a href="https://www.facebook.com/washuengineering/videos/10155903636723095/">Engineering alumnus Bob Behnken chosen as one of NASA's astronauts who will fly spacecraft to and from the International Space Station.</a><br/></p><p><strong>twitter:</strong><strong> </strong><a href="https://twitter.com/WashUengineers/status/973253695117971461">Who earned the first U.S. medal of the 2018 @Paralympics? A WashU engineer — Kendall Gretsch '14!</a><br/></p><p><strong>instagram: </strong><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BhHtv6LBaP5/">Catch 'em if you can. More rain in #STL now... #WashU #cherryblossoms</a><br/></p></div></div><p><br/></p>2018-12-17T06:00:00ZWashU engineers continued their strong research tradition in 2018. These are 10 stories that had the most impact and reach in 2018.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/The-Discoverer-Lan-Yang.aspx979The Discoverer: Lan Yang<img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Yang_Lan.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​</p><div class="ms-rtestate-read ms-rte-wpbox" contenteditable="false"><div class="ms-rtestate-notify ms-rtestate-read da185ba3-2092-469b-94f0-2e37e84d06cc" id="div_da185ba3-2092-469b-94f0-2e37e84d06cc"></div><div id="vid_da185ba3-2092-469b-94f0-2e37e84d06cc" style="display: none;"></div></div><p>Being dedicated, curious and having a self-described persistence and “passion for science” has contributed to Yang’s already successful career. In 2010, she was honored by President Barack Obama with a <a href="/news/Pages/WUSTL-scientist-wins-prestigious-Presidential-Early-Career-Award.aspx" style="box-sizing: inherit;">Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers</a> (PECASE).</p><p>It was because of that curiosity that she once took a course in entrepreneurship. She filed her first patent as a graduate student. Now Yang, the Edwin H. and Florence G. Skinner Professor in the <a href="http://engineering.wustl.edu/" style="box-sizing: inherit;">School of Engineering & Applied Science</a> at Washington University in St. Louis, holds the most patents and disclosures of any female faculty member.<br/></p><p><a href="https://fuse.wustl.edu/the-discoverer-lan-yang/">>> Read the full article on FUSE</a><br/></p><span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Lan Yang<br/></h3><div style="text-align: left;"><ul style="color: #343434; padding-left: 20px; caret-color: #343434;"><li>Edwin H. & Florence G. Skinner Professor</li><li>Expertise: Photonics, optical sensing, microresonators, lasers, non-Hermitian physics, parity-time symmetry in photonics<br/></li></ul></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Lan-Yang.aspx">>> ​View Bio</a></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <br/> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <a href="https://ese.wustl.edu/Pages/default.aspx">>> Electrical & Systems Engineering</a>​<br/></div></div></span><span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>More research from Professor Lan Yang </h3><div><ul><li> <a href="/news/Pages/Breaking-the-laws-of-science.aspx"><span style="font-size: 1em;">Breaking the laws of science</span></a></li><li> <span style="font-size: 1em;"><a href="/news/Pages/Engineers-find-a-way-to-win-in-laser-performance-by-losing.aspx">Engineers find a way to win in laser performance by losing</a> </span></li><li> <span style="font-size: 1em;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Engineers-develop-new-sensor-to-detect-tiny-individual-nanoparticles.aspx">Engineers develop new sensor to detect tiny individual nanoparticles</a></span></li></ul></div></div></span>FUSEhttps://fuse.wustl.edu/the-discoverer-lan-yang/2018-12-04T06:00:00ZWashU Women Innovate: At 14, inspired by stories of world-changing science and new technologies, Lan Yang was so committed to becoming a scientist, she went on a hunger strike.<p>WashU Women Innovate: At 14, inspired by stories of world-changing science and new technologies, Lan Yang was so committed to becoming a scientist, she went on a hunger strike. <a href="https://fuse.wustl.edu/the-discoverer-lan-yang/">>> Read the full article on FUSE</a><br/></p>