https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/meet-the-class-of-2019-valedictorians.aspx1051Meet the Class of 2019 Valedictorians<img alt="2019 Valedictorians " src="/news/PublishingImages/2019%20Valedictorians%20group.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />This May, the McKelvey School of Engineering will celebrate the achievements of the class of 2019 during its annual <a href="/current-students/student-services/Pages/commencement.aspx">Engineering Student Recognition Ceremony</a>. As part of that celebration, we highlight those students who have excelled beyond their peers by earning the class’s highest academic marks. <div><br/></div><div>Meet the McKelvey Engineering Class of 2019 valedictorians and learn more about how their experience at Washington University in St. Louis has prepared them for their futures. <br/></div><div> <style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073697537 9 0 511 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} @page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --> </style> <h2>Blake Bordelon<br/></h2><div><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Bordelon_Blake_5206.JPG?RenditionID=6" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>Blake Bordelon will earn bachelor’s degrees in systems engineering and physics, as well as a minor in computer science. After Commencement, he plans to pursue a PhD in applied mathematics at Harvard. <br/></div><h3>Name a faculty or staff member who played an important role in your WashU experience.</h3><div>Ralf Wessel (professor in physics in Arts & Sciences) was the research mentor on my first project in computational neuroscience and has helped me navigate conducting a research project from initial conception through the peer-review process. He has been very generous in his time and energy and has helped me grow as an aspiring scientist. <br/></div><h3>What drew you to study engineering? </h3><div>While my personality draws me toward abstract reasoning and mathematics, the impact of technology on human welfare is immense. Engineering allows me the opportunity to employ these mathematical reasoning methods to solve problems that matter. <br/></div><h3>As you take the next steps in your education, what are you most excited about? </h3><div>I am excited to specialize. So much of undergraduate education — especially in my case — is spent acquiring a wide base of general knowledge. While this is crucial to understanding the world and one's place in it, specialization generates greater economic efficiency and consumer benefits. Finding a niche in the economy could allow me to be more productive. <br/></div><div><br/></div><h2>William Galik </h2><div><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Galik_William_5209.jpg?RenditionID=6" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>William Galik will earn a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and a minor in materials science. He plans to go to graduate school to study structural engineering at the University of Washington.<br/></div><h3>What piece of advice do you wish you had known on your first day at WashU? </h3><div>It took me nearly two years to realize that school is easier and less stressful when you make friends in class. There is something to be said about struggling through a course alone, but trying to succeed in six or seven courses without a study group can be frustrating. I made some of my best friends and learned the most once I began trusting my classmates. WashU is a place to meet smart people of any discipline and learn together. <br/></div><h3>What's your favorite memory from your time at WashU? </h3><div>The time I spent hanging out with my roommates. Whether we were watching “Dumb and Dumber” on repeat or hanging out in the park, those guys always made me laugh. <br/></div><h3>Why did you decide to attend WashU? </h3><div>WashU offered me great athletics and academics close to home. I loved the atmosphere of the basketball team when I came to camp as a high schooler, and I was sold on <g class="gr_ gr_113 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_disable_anim_appear Grammar only-del replaceWithoutSep" id="113" data-gr-id="113">the education</g> when I came to Engineering Day for prospective students. I remember deciding to come to WashU after talking to Professor Jessica Wagenseil about opportunities in wind energy in the mechanical engineering department. <br/></div><div><br/></div><h2>Ayush Kumar </h2><div><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Kumar_Ayush_5171.JPG?RenditionID=6" forceimagesizeinit="true" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>Ayush Kumar will earn a bachelor’s degrees in biomedical engineering and healthcare management. He will continue his studies and earn his MD and <g class="gr_ gr_153 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_disable_anim_appear Punctuation multiReplace" id="153" data-gr-id="153">PhD</g> at the University of Massachusetts.  </div><h3>What piece of advice do you wish you had known on your first day at WashU? </h3><div>There's an endless amount of resources available on campus to help overcome the challenges of different courses. Whether it's the assistants to the instructor, teaching assistants, professors or problem-solving teams, each provides the necessary support you need to be successful. <br/></div><h3>Name a faculty or staff member who played an important role in your WashU experience. </h3><div>Rohit Pappu is one of my favorite professors in the biomedical engineering department because he challenged us to be critical thinkers and find ways to apply our knowledge to real life problems. His enthusiasm and support for each student in his class were what made me excited to attend class and think outside the box. My major motivations to pursue a <g class="gr_ gr_156 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_disable_anim_appear Punctuation multiReplace" id="156" data-gr-id="156">PhD</g> stems from his support and advice over the years. <br/></div><h3>What will you miss most at WashU? </h3><div>My professors and <g class="gr_ gr_147 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_disable_anim_appear Punctuation only-del replaceWithoutSep" id="147" data-gr-id="147">peers,</g> and the supportive environment here made me proud to be a WashU student. Knowing I won't be on campus much longer to see them on a regular basis is heartbreaking, but I'm happy to have had them for the past four years. I am sure they will all be important parts of my life in my future endeavors.<br/></div><div><br/></div><h2>Sirui Li <br/></h2><div><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Li_Sirui_5190.JPG?RenditionID=6" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>Sirui Li will graduate with bachelor’s degrees in computer science and mathematics. She plans to earn a PhD in social and engineering systems from MIT's Institute for Data, Systems and Society. <br/></div><h3>Name a faculty or staff member who played an important role in your WashU experience.</h3><div>Sanmay Das. He is a fantastic instructor, research PI <g class="gr_ gr_121 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_disable_anim_appear Punctuation only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="121" data-gr-id="121">and</g> mentor. I took his two courses, CSE 417: Intro to Machine Learning and CSE 516: Multi-agent Systems, in my sophomore year, and he was such an amazing instructor. I had a lot of fun taking the class and have been doing research with him since. <br/></div><div><br/></div><div>As a PI, he sincerely cares about my progress without being overly pushy. I get to have weekly meetings with him to update him on my progress where he gives me useful suggestions as to what the next steps are and encourages me when I’m stuck. I’m applying to grad school and he gave me tons of useful suggestions and information. Overall, he is just a fantastic person, and I learned so much from him. <br/></div><h3>What is your favorite place on campus? </h3><div>Both Holmes Lounge and the Physics library in Crow Hall. I go to Holmes Lounge every time I want to socialize with my friends or work on a group project. The Physics library is a super quiet place, and I go there every time I want to get my work done. <br/></div><h3>What piece of advice do you wish you had known on your first day at WashU? </h3><div>TA hours are helpful. I didn't go to any in my freshman year because my courses were manageable. However, during my sophomore year, one of the courses I took — which was an upper-level undergraduate course — was so hard that I struggled a lot. I realized there were TAs for this class who held TA hours. I went and they helped me with the homework problems I was stuck on and explained concepts taught in class that I didn't fully understand. After that, I went to more TA hours and found myself learning the concepts much better. <br/></div><div><br/></div><h2>Liam Plambeck </h2><div><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Plambeck_Liam_5192.jpg?RenditionID=6" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>Liam Plambeck will earn a bachelor’s degree in systems engineering with a minor in computer science. After Commencement, he will work as a business technology analyst with Deloitte in Chicago. <br/></div><h3>What was the most difficult course you completed for your degree? How did you overcome the challenge? </h3><div>CSE 330: Rapid Prototype Development and Creative Programming. In this course, you essentially learn a new coding language every two weeks and code a difficult website with it. This was by far the biggest challenge for me in my four years here, and that sense of complete confusion is something I felt more in that class than ever before. I was able to get through it with the support of my partner and other classmates. The supportive, collaborative nature of WashU is something that is truly special that I have loved during my time here.<br/></div><h3>Why did you decide to attend WashU? </h3><div>It just felt right. I remember I was visiting WashU for my final admitted student visit. Coming into it, I was convinced I was going elsewhere; but, once I stepped foot on campus, I immediately called my dad and told him that this was the place for me. In many ways, it just felt like a home away from home. The campus is absolutely beautiful, and I loved all the little archways and brick buildings. Everyone I had met on campus was so kind and genuine, and I knew that I would love to be here. <br/></div><h3>What piece of advice do you wish you had known on your first day at WashU? </h3><div>Put yourself in uncomfortable and daunting positions — as long as you feel safe! While it may be scary at first to think about holding an executive position of an organization in your first couple of years on campus, WashU is a place where you can and should do that. I learned far more from being in uncomfortable and daunting positions in student groups than anywhere else during my four years here.<br/></div></div><style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073697537 9 0 511 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} @page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --> </style><style> <!-- /* Font Definitions */ @font-face {font-family:"Cambria Math"; panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:roman; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:3 0 0 0 1 0;} @font-face {font-family:Calibri; panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4; mso-font-charset:0; mso-generic-font-family:swiss; mso-font-pitch:variable; mso-font-signature:-536859905 -1073697537 9 0 511 0;} /* Style Definitions */ p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal {mso-style-unhide:no; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; margin:0in; margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} .MsoChpDefault {mso-style-type:export-only; mso-default-props:yes; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} @page WordSection1 {size:8.5in 11.0in; margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in; mso-header-margin:.5in; mso-footer-margin:.5in; mso-paper-source:0;} div.WordSection1 {page:WordSection1;} --> </style>From left: Blake Bordelon, Sirui Li, William Galik, Ayush Kumar and Liam Plambeck.Danielle Lacey2019-05-07T05:00:00ZCelebrate the McKelvey Engineering students who have performed above and beyond academically
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/HIVE-wins-$25,000-grand-prize-in-2019-Discovery-Competition.aspx1074HIVE wins $25,000 grand prize in 2019 Discovery Competition <img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Discovery-Competition-1230x431.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>A team of students that developed a way to monitor intravenous medication compliance has won the 2019 Discovery Competition sponsored by the McKelvey School of Engineering. The prize includes a $20,000 cash award, $5,000 in-kind services from Custom Technologies and $5,000 in in-kind legal services from Polsinelli, which has sponsored the Discovery Competition for the past five years. </p><p>Four teams competed this year for the prizes, which include six months of complimentary workspace from TechArtista, a collaborative workspace in the Central West End founded by McKelvey Engineering alumnus <a href="/news/Pages/Engineering-degree-positions-alum-to-solve-problems-as-entrepreneur.aspx">Chris Holt</a>. In addition to 24/7 access to the workspace, team members will have the opportunity to connect with the St. Louis professional community and increase access to the St. Louis ecosystem.</p><p>"This year's teams were a great mix of teams ready to hit the ground running with their products and teams with exciting potential technology development," said Dennis Mell, director of the Discovery Competition and professor of practice in electrical & systems engineering. </p><p>HIVE's technology is designed to monitor compliance with outpatient parental antimicrobial therapy (OPAT). The goal is to provide accurate, real-time data to physicians and insurance companies including but not limited to: when the patient takes their medication, how many times a day the patient takes their medication, and how long the patient takes their medication. The key aspect of its technology is that it will not require any additional steps by the user. OPAT costs about $300 per day, which is about 10 times less expensive than inpatient care. However, OPAT has a 25% unplanned readmission rate overall, with 9% of the 25% due to non-compliance. The group's market will be the physicians and pharmacists who re-admit noncompliant patients, and those who spend time following up with patients to ensure their compliance.</p><p>Team members include Joe Beggs (CEO/ engineer), a student majoring in biomedical engineering; Sai Dodda (clinical coordinator), a student at St. Louis College of Pharmacy; Allie Frank (clinical coordinator), a master's student in occupational therapy; Glen Kleinschmidt (engineer), a BS/MS student in biomedical engineering; and Chris Sleckman (engineer), a BS/MS student in biomedical engineering. </p><p>The team winning second place, which includes a $7,500 cash award, $2,500 in in-kind legal services from Polsinelli and an invitation to compete in the 2020 final Discovery Competition, was Dose To Go, which developed a smart vaccine patch designed to ensure accurate, localized and pain-free vaccine delivery to be administered at home. This vaccine patch integrates a bioreactive base, which allows for temporal progress tracking, accurate drug delivery confirmation, and automatic linkage to user's online health record for convenient vaccine record. Team members include Thao Cao, a student majoring in biomedical engineering; Noah Goldstein, a student majoring in computer science; and Christopher Sheffels, a student majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in materials science & engineering. </p><p>Tying for third place, which includes a $2,500 cash prize for each team and $2,500 in legal services from Intellect Law Firm, were the Flex.ai team and Mediband team. </p><p>Flex.Ai is a cloud-based platform designed to improve the life of all physical therapy patients. With advanced computer vision algorithms using posture recognition, the Flex.Ai app tracks a patient in real time and gives them feedback throughout each exercise. Through the use of automated reminders and progress tracking, patients with Flex.Ai will recover quickly and properly. Team members include Nick Cornejo, a student majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in computer science; Michael Greer, a student majoring in computer engineering with a minor in robotics; and Jack Leshem, a student majoring in computer science with a second major in finance. </p><p>MediBand is working to make medication management easy through a low-cost Internet of Things (IOT) bracelet that manages a patient's prescriptions right on their wrist. Its technology serves individuals who are prescribed time-sensitive medication by integrating their medication into a consistent part of their daily lives. The team is seeking funding to build a low volume of bracelets that to give to prospective users to further explore market needs. Team members include Sam Margolis, a student majoring in computer science; Anton Salem, a student majoring in systems science & engineering; and James Swingos, an undergraduate student at Harvard University.<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p> </p><p><br/></p>Beth Miller 2019-05-03T05:00:00ZMedical technology team HIVE wins Discovery Competition, which includes a $20,000 cash prize.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/We-do-research-to-help-people.aspx1068‘We do research to help people’<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/190409_sjh_guangming_zhao_05-1-1200x600.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Guangming Zhao says it repeatedly: “I’m just a normal person.” He doesn’t understand why anyone would be interested in talking to him, a 29-year-old PhD candidate in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, who just wants to create the best imaging sensor in the world.</p><p> And there’s a good chance he’ll be successful.</p><p>“At first, I didn’t believe it,” he said of the research’s potential to impact the world around him. “But now I do believe it. I believe that what we do here can change the world.”<br/></p><p>Zhao is working on new technology that uses light to probe its surroundings. Used in different instruments, the photonic sensors could detect anything from poisonous gases to bloodborne diseases.<br/></p><p>He attributes his change in perspective to working in the lab of <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Lan-Yang.aspx" style="box-sizing: inherit;">Lan Yang</a>, the Edwin H. & Florence G. Skinner Professor of Electrical & Systems Engineering. Since working with her, he said, he has had a few changes of heart.</p><p>When he joined Yang’s lab in 2012, Zhao considered himself a physics guy. “I wanted to focus on fundamental science,” he said. Zhao wasn’t concerned with practical applications. When Yang proposed he work on the photonic sensors, he wasn’t exactly thrilled.</p><p>“Dr. Yang said it was interesting, but at first I disagreed,” Zhao said. “I said, ‘I like fundamental science.’ When I really accomplished something, though, I saw it was worth it.”</p><p>Zhao has pushed forward the science of the sensors, which have <a href="/news/Pages/Enabling-internet-of-photonic-things-with-miniature-sensors.aspx" style="box-sizing: inherit;">successfully recorded temperature data</a> while mounted on a drone. The photonic sensors — which are based on light instead of electricity — may also greatly increase the sensitivity of ultrasound technology, an industry <a href="https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/ultrasound-devices-market-to-rise-us-70-billion-by-2022-2018-12-18" style="box-sizing: inherit;">estimated to be worth $7.2 billion by 2022</a>.</p><p></p><p>“In the ultrasound arena, this technology has the potential to be a breakthrough,” said Anand Chandrasekher, an industry adviser who came across Zhao’s research through a mutual friend of Yang’s. He is now helping lab members determine if they are ready to transition their technology from the lab to the marketplace.</p><p>Chandrasekher has been in the semiconductor industry for 30 years. From president of Qualcomm Datacenter Technologies Inc. to seeking out technology transfer opportunities in university labs, he has seen all sorts of people come and go.</p><p>“(Zhao) is in a league of his own in terms of perseverance, creativity, objective analysis,” Chandrasekher said. “He’s not a BS artist; he says what he means, does what he says, and he gets it done.”</p><p>Although they can’t reveal the precise nature of Zhao’s contribution to the sensors as they continue to research their viability as a product, Chandrasekher is clear when it comes to Zhao’s importance: “Let’s just say that without him, there is no company.”</p><p>For now, however, Zhao remains dedicated to his work in the lab. In fact, he could have graduated a couple of years ago.<br/></p><p>“When my fifth year came, Dr. Yang asked, ‘Do you want to graduate?’ I refused to graduate,” he said laughing. “I wanted to finish what I started.”</p><p>That perseverance is one of the qualities that sets Zhao apart, according to Yang.</p><p>“He could face 100 failures and keep going,” she said, recounting the time she saw him in the lab well past midnight. It’s possible that someone else could have developed these sensors, “but everyone said it was impossible. Zhao, however, did not give up.”</p> <h3>A chance to study with ‘one of the best’</h3><p>The road to St. Louis began for Zhao in Tianjin, a city of 13 million people about 35 miles south of Beijing. He attended college at the University of Science and Technology of China — Yang’s alma mater — where he majored in optics.<br/></p><p>And there’s a simple reason he came to Washington University. “Dr. Yang is here,” he said. “She is one of the best.”</p><p>Studying so far away from home can be challenging; Zhao has only been home twice and his parents have visited once. They liked St. Louis almost as much as he does.</p><p>“Washington University is a really good place for research,” he said. “I really like it here — the students, the teachers, the people here,” he said, gesturing to those around him in nearby Kayak’s Coffee.</p><p>Zhao’s modesty is apparent in his incredulity at the idea that anyone wanted to interview him. His kindness was apparent in his offer to run home and fetch an umbrella for his interviewer when a downpour hit at the end of the interview.</p><p>“What I value most about him, while he says he’s normal, I look inside his heart, that’s what matters,” Yang said. “He just wants to do good work. Money will not move him.”</p><p>Zhao’s goal is straightforward: “I want to have the best sensor in the world,” he said. He hopes it will ultimately be able to detect diseases that current ultrasound machines can’t.</p><p>“We can help people in the medical school, and maybe also help patients. Our sensor also has a low cost and high sensitivity,” he said. “So we may really change the world. At first, I didn’t believe it, but now I do think we have a chance to do that. To help people.”</p><p>When he first arrived in St. Louis, Zhao was a physics guy interested in blue-sky research. “At first, I just wanted to learn some things,” he said. “Later on, I learned something from my mentor. I realized that I need to have a sense of mission and a duty as a researcher.</p><p>“So we do research to help people. I think all researchers should realize that.”</p> <strong>Read more about the Class Acts of 2019 <a href="https://source.wustl.edu/washu19/" style="box-sizing: inherit;">here</a>.<br/></strong><span> <div class="cstm-section"><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; font-family: "open sans", sans-serif; font-size: 1.34em; text-align: center; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-color: #b0b0b0; padding-bottom: 12px;">More about<br/>Guangming Zhao<br/></h3><div style="color: #343434;"><div style="text-align: center;"></div><p style="text-align: left;"> <strong>Hometown: </strong>Tianjin, China</p><p style="text-align: left;"> <strong>Age: </strong>29</p><p style="text-align: left;"> <strong>Degrees: </strong>PhD candidate in electrical systems engineering at the McKelvey School of Engineering. He also holds a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Science and Technology of China.<br/></p></div></div></div></span> <br/><span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Improving quality of life​</h3><div style="text-align: left;"><div> <span> <div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Pratim-Biswas.aspx"></a><img src="/news/PublishingImages/190410_wcc_michael_kramer_07.jpg?RenditionID=7" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/> </strong></div> <div style="text-align: left;"><p>Michael Kramer, who will graduate in May with a master’s in data analytics and statistics from the McKelvey School of Engineering and already has a marketing degree from Olin Business School, has always been an entrepreneur. As a student, he developed a contact management app called Regavi that is evolving into a secure way of sharing data. Read about another Class Act in innovation <a href="/news/Pages/A-well-rounded-entreprenurial-education.aspx">here</a>.<br/></p></div></span></div></div></div></span>Guangming Zhao, a PhD candidate in the McKelvey School of Engineering, in the research lab of Lan Yang. (Photo: Sid Hastings/Washington University)Brandie Jeffersonhttps://source.wustl.edu/2019/04/we-do-research-to-help-people/2019-04-29T05:00:00Z​Class Acts-Innovation: Guangming Zhao may change the ultrasound industry, but what he really wants to do is help people<p>​Class Acts-Innovation: Guangming Zhao may change the ultrasound industry, but what he really wants to do is help people<br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/seniors-lead-yearlong-project-to-expand-solar-power-at-tyson-research-center.aspx1061Seniors lead yearlong project to expand solar power at Tyson Research Center<p>​The Tyson Research Center isn't like most labs you’d find at Washington University in St. Louis. Located in Eureka, Missouri, the center sits on more than 2,000 acres of forested landscape full of trees, ferns, mushrooms, wildflowers and other plants.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/ese-solar-panel-tyson.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />For students Maya Coyle, Kyle Cepeda and Sarah Chen, seniors majoring in electrical & systems engineering (ESE) at the McKelvey School of Engineering, the center provides an invaluable opportunity to study renewable energy and sustainable power systems. <div><br/><div>"Working at Tyson has given us a lot of real-world experience in engineering," Chen said. "We were able to learn what goes on beyond proposing an installation — things like permit requirements and working with other contractors."<br/><div><div><div><div><div><br/></div><div>“Some of my good friends have worked there doing environmental biology and ecology research,” Coyle said. “Ours is definitely a different experience than the research typically done at Tyson and was also pretty unconventional for an ESE senior design project.” </div><div><br/></div><div>This unconventional project also was a desperately needed one. For all its beauty and research capabilities, Tyson Research Center suffers from a failing power grid. With frequent outages — some lasting a full day — and no available backup generating capabilities, the lack of reliable power inhibits research.<br/></div><div><br/></div><div>As part of their senior design capstone course, Coyle, Cepeda and Chen designed a sustainable power system for the center using materials from previous projects, including WashU’s entry in the 2017 Solar Decathlon. The team got so invested in the design that it decided to continue its work the following semester as an independent study course. </div><div><br/></div><div>Along with the staff and researchers at the Tyson Research Center, the team also is collaborating with professionals within the industry, including EFS Energy. And, this spring, they worked with the Office of Sustainability to install a row of new solar panels to expand the center’s power capabilities.<br/></div><div><br/></div><div>"Once our project was approved by facilities management, it started moving very quickly," Chen said. "A lot of groundwork had already been done by Tyson, as well as the electricians they were partnered with. We had the opportunity to help install a few of the remaining uninstalled solar panels, as well as speak with the electricians to confirm our schematics."<br/></div><div><br/></div><div>“We gained experience communicating technical ideas with fellow engineers at EFS Energy, the director of Tyson, and representatives from the Office of Sustainability and the Facilities department,” Cepeda said. “The lessons learned are not things that can be learned through exams or problem sets in class, yet they are still very much part of the wholistic engineering design process that takes place in industry.”<br/><br/></div><div><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/seniors-lead-yearlong-project-to-expand-solar-power-at-tyson-research-center/ese-solar-panel-tyson-2.jpg?RenditionID=1" alt="ese-solar-panel-tyson-2.jpg" class="ms-rtePosition-2 ms-rteImage-0" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>From the recycled materials to the solar-powered grid, the entire project aligns neatly with the center’s mission to sustainable operations. </div><div><br/></div><div>“As engineers, we have a responsibility to advance research on renewables to ensure a sustainable and reliable energy future, while being mindful of the ethical implications of the resources we use,” Coyle said. “Maybe a 10-kilowatt solar array is a drop in the bucket, but I hope it will engage engineering students and encourage research on microgrids and renewables.”</div><div><br/></div><div>Coyle and Cepeda each had experience designing electrical systems but had never worked with solar or battery storage. They credit their work at the center with helping them develop the real-world skills needed to engineer such a complex project.</div><div><br/></div><div>“I’ve learned so much, not just about engineering and design, but also about navigating local energy policies and bureaucratic slow-downs that make renewable energy projects challenging,” Coyle said. “In any engineering work, there is always more than just the technical aspect of a project, so it’s important to understand what all goes into creating something.”</div><div><br/></div><div>“Renewable energy will have to be the future of our world’s energy infrastructure if we wish to continue living the type of lifestyles we are currently accustomed to,” Cepeda said. “People all around the world are realizing the need for a more sustainable future and with this the race to create the best renewable technologies is just beginning.”<br/></div></div></div></div></div></div></div>From left: Kyle Cepeda, Sarah Chen and Maya Coyle at the Tyson Research Center. Photos by Whitney CurtisDanielle Lacey2019-04-23T05:00:00ZA trio of students studying electrical & systems engineering will help expand the solar power generating capabilities at the center, which has frequent outages.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Alumnus-Bose-enjoys-research-in-the-Antarctic.aspx1063Alumnus Bose enjoys research in the Antarctic<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/IMG_3727.JPG?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Richard Bose knows what it's like to go to the ends of the earth for science. </p><p>Bose, who earned a master's in electrical engineering from McKelvey School of Engineering in 2008, has gone to Antarctica three times since 2012 to support research on cosmic rays and X-rays. As a research engineer in the Laboratory for Experimental Astrophysics in the Department of Physics at Washington University in St. Louis, he works on the SuperTIGER and X-Calibur projects. SuperTIGER studies what made cosmic rays and how they get their energy, while X-Calibur studies the polarization of X-rays emitted by astrophysical sources. </p><p>Most recently, in late 2018 and early 2019, he and the team spent 73 days in Antarctica, celebrating Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year's Day at McMurdo Station, the United States' research station on Ross Island, the solid ground farthest south that is accessible by ship. Except Bose and the WashU team, led by Henric Krawczynski, professor of physics, and Brian Rauch, research assistant professor of physics who earned two bachelor's degrees, a master's degree and a doctorate from WashU, didn't get to McMurdo Station by ship. They flew from St. Louis to New Zealand, where they had two days of orientation and got outfitted with gear appropriate for working outdoors in Antarctica's frigid temperatures. Then the team boarded a U.S. Air Force C-17 cargo plane from Christchurch, New Zealand, for a five-hour flight, only to land on a runway of packed snow on the Ross Ice Shelf. </p><p>"We go in November, which is their summer so the sun never sets, and the weather is similar to St. Louis' weather at that time," said Bose, who also earned a bachelor's degree in economics and physics from WashU in 2001 and has worked at the university since 2005. "But we can't launch the balloon until conditions are right, so we get it ready, then wait." </p><p>SuperTIGER, which stands for Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder, is a 4,000-pound balloon-borne instrument developed to measure the elemental composition of ultra-heavy galactic cosmic-ray nuclei and to accurately measure the energy spectra of the more abundant light elements. Its inaugural flight was in 2012–2013, sending down data after 55 days in the air. In 2016-2017, the team attempted to launch the balloon 16 times, but the winds were uncooperative. The team left its equipment there to winter over until it returned in November 2018. </p><p>"We had two flight attempts this year," Bose said. "The second time it launched, but then something happened and the balloon leaked. We got a six-hour flight, but no data. It was brutal. It can be so successful, and it can be so heartbreaking. The broader story is perseverance on the harsh continent."</p><p>As research engineer, Bose is responsible for the electronics and circuit boards in SuperTIGER and X-Calibur as well as managing the technical efforts of the science team and interfacing with Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility personnel who support and launch NASA's balloon missions. </p><p>"As soon as something doesn't work quite right, they all look at me," he said.  </p><p>Bose also worked on the X-Calibur project, a telescope used to observe the X-ray emission from a sample of black holes, neutron stars, and pulsars in the Milky Way galaxy. The team develops all of the electronics at WashU and integrates them into the telescope. X-Calibur flew for three days on its most recent mission, and the team has proposed to rebuild and fly again in a few years.</p><p>Bose said the balloons and their payloads are about 8,000 pounds combined. </p><div class="ms-rtestate-read ms-rte-embedcode ms-rte-embedil ms-rtestate-notify" contenteditable="false"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/9zmKAD--zRM" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture"></iframe> </div><p>When he's not building equipment for the scientific equipment, Bose is taking photographs. On the team's most recent trip, he took <a href="http://www.facebook.com/thesupertiger">thousands of photographs</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCmGJdfmL8Hv9YxVa577oZOw">some videos</a> to document the preparation, launch and recovery of the SuperTIGER. He compares his work on the project to a small business. </p><p>"We get to see the projects all the way through," he said. "We work with scientists and diagrams and get to pick out equipment and buy that. I design circuit boards and arrange for them to be made and assembled, do some debugging and FPGA programming, and maybe write a little bit of software."</p><p>Bose said the team plans to return to Antarctica for another try at the end of this year. In the meantime, some of the equipment has come back to WashU for the team to work on before its next trip.  <br/></p>Richard Bose with research equipment in Antarctica, where a WashU team goes annually to study cosmic rays.Beth Miller 2019-04-23T05:00:00ZAlumnus Richard Bose manages the technical efforts of the SuperTIGER and X-Calibur research teams in Antarctica.<p>​Alumnus Richard Bose manages the technical efforts of the SuperTIGER and X-Calibur research teams in Antarctica<br/></p>